Tag Archives: rare books

Christmas pudding: a strange disorderly jumble and mishmash

For what excess of Riot, Uncleanness, Prophaneness, Intemperancies in Meat and Drinks, Words and Works, with all kinds of Superfluity of Naughtiness do the greatest number of People not commit in these days (which yet they call Holy) … Entertaining … Continue reading

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What could you borrow from an 18th-century Quaker meeting library?

“The perusal of valuable books, besides enlarging the mind, and promoting our temporal comfort and advantage, may be the means of spreading before us a pleasing view of the beauty and excellence of religion” A catalogue of the books, belonging … Continue reading

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Milan to Madagascar: a best seller’s back story

In 2003 the Library received a gift of a copy of De imitatione Christi (The Imitation of Christ) by Thomas à Kempis, published at Milan in 1488. We were a little awed at first. Described within the world of Quakerism … Continue reading

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Catherine Impey of Street, Somerset, and her radical anti-racist newspaper

Between 1888 and 1895, Catherine Impey (1847–1923) of Street, Somerset, wrote and published what is credited as being Britain’s first anti-racist periodical. Anti-Caste, as it was called, is one of the most remarkable serials in our collection: the Library holds … Continue reading

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A controversial cabinet

Sitting in the corner of the strongrooms is a wooden cabinet containing a collection of printed works known as as the “Braithwaite Collection”, gifted to the Library in 1907 under certain conditions. In his will Joseph Bevan Braithwaite (1818—1905) wrote: … Continue reading

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Quaker sufferings records: an “embarras de richesse”

Readers of early Quaker literature cannot fail to be aware of the history of religious persecution of the Quakers in the seventeenth century. Although the Act of Toleration of 1689 marked the end of its most extreme forms, Quakers continued … Continue reading

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