Good cheer!

What’s going to be in your Christmas stocking? Something good, we hope! For our final blogpost of 2016 we want to celebrate some of the “gifts” you’ve shared  over the past twelve months. There have been some heartening acts of generosity – both regular and surprising. We have many reasons to be thankful!

Every fortnight a dedicated group of NADFAS volunteers gather in the Library reading room to de-staple and re-sew our modern pamphlets a Herculean task they’ve been working on for over six years. Over the autumn we’ve also had the help of a student conservator, who’s been treating some more challenging items. Through this painstaking and unglamorous work a great many rare late 19th and 20th century pamphlets are being protected from the damaging effects of rust on paper.

A small team of other volunteers offer their skill and time regularly too. Between them, they carry out basic paper repairs in-house, check large collections of donated material, and provide invaluable support to the retrospective cataloguing project. Thank you, volunteers, for your time, good will and constancy!

NADFAS team at work

Without a paid ministry, Quaker meetings run on the voluntary service of their members, who may undertake a range of roles. One of these is the role of “meeting librarian” (meetings are encouraged to maintain libraries for the use of Friends and attenders, as an aid to the life of the meeting and outreach). Earlier this year Quaker Life Network formed a new “Quaker Meeting Librarians Cluster” (inspired by an earlier discussion group set up and run for over a decade by Nic Wright, former librarian at Bolton Meeting), intended as a forum for sharing experience, discussing books and swapping tips.

Not long after the cluster was established, a reader came to us looking for a loan copy of The Communion of life, Joan Mary Fry’s 1910 Swarthmore lecture. As a shot in the dark, we emailed the cluster. Suddenly, and quite unexpectedly, there were messages from meeting librarians all over the country generously offering to track down and lend the book from their own collections. The reader was delighted, and so were we. And a bit awed. Meeting librarians are amazing: you clearly have a passion for sharing!

A catalogue of the books, belonging to the Friends of Leeds Particular Meeting (Leeds: Printed by J. Binns, 1794)

 

We’ve blogged before about how much we and our other users owe to the generosity of researchers who share their own work with the Library. A large proportion of new accessions – scholarly historical works, biographies, articles, novels, local history and more are presented to the Library by their authors, and this year was no exception.  Topics included politics, theology, the role of women, radicalism, peace, voluntary service, and individual people and places, across four centuries, reflecting the broad compass of our collections. Here’s a random selection of some of the 2016 accessions:

 

To ensure the survival of our collections for the future, professional conservation treatment is sometimes needed, funded by our BeFriend a Book scheme. So we were delighted when the recent blogpost about our student conservator’s project prompted one reader to make a generous donation to the fund. Thanks to everyone who has donated, whether it’s a lot or a little, for making this work possible!

Among items conserved this year were 16 tract volumes – volumes of separately published works collected and bound up together (mainly 17th-18th century). Their significance as physical objects is enhanced by their associations with places and people, so any trace of former ownership (inscriptions, marginal notes, bookplates, etc.) is meticulously preserved. Here are tract volumes 294, 326 and 517, three of those conserved in 2016 with noteworthy provenance:

And those are just a few of the kindnesses we’ve witnessed in 2016. Thank you all, friends, whether you’ve shared your time, your money, your own research, or – not least – your good will.

Very warm wishes to users and friends of the Library for Christmas and the new year!

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2 Responses to Good cheer!

  1. Beth Allen says:

    A few days ago I was thrilled to see the first minute book of Six Weeks Meeting, dating from 1671. For the last eight years, we have been establishing SWM as a registered charity. James Grant, an ex-SWM trustee, spent hours in the Library archives checking the status of all the deeds of the property owned by SWM, meeting houses and burial grounds, so that the Charity Commission had an accurate list. This enabled us to take on appropriate modern legal status as the London Quakers Property Trust. Library staff brought out property deeds and we deciphered ornate handwriting and odd abbreviations. Finally we got all the legalities sorted out, and made our final minutes as SWM, in the presence of the first minute book, released for us specially for the occasion by the Library staff. (Don’t worry, we didn’t touch it!) We remembered those early Friends. The current minute book will be bound and lodged in the Library with all the others. Thank you for holding our history! Beth Allen, clerk, SWM/LQPT.

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